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Cognition and Perception

Within the field of cognition and perception, I have been asking the following questions:

Time is too short: Studies on time perception

Are Laterality and Spatial Abilities involved in Clumsiness?

Time is too short: Studies on time perception

Research on time perception has fascinated me for a while, but it all started through a collaboration with Simon Grondin (from Universite Laval). For example, we likely conducted the first psychophysical dichotic listening study of time perception and obtained a right ear advantage (Grondin, Voyer, & Bisson, 2011).

Afterward, we examined the influence of affective factors on time perception. We have a series of experiments planned for this and two publications have already appeared as a result of this work (Fallow & Voyer, 2013; Voyer & Reuangrith, 2015). Lately, I have been examining how spatial effects might interact with lateralized presentation to affect time estimation. In addition, my doctoral student Corinna McFeaters has been investigating how contextual sets might affect time perception in repeated stimuli. There is plenty of room for students to get involved in this research!

 

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Are Laterality and Spatial Abilities involved in Clumsiness?

The likelihood of repeatedly having accidents involves both environmental and personal factors. Recently, I have started examining what individual difference component may be relevant. Specifically, I am examining the question pertaining to which specific factors increase the likelihood of accidents, regardless of the environment. Handedness is often linked to accident proneness, however, that is only one measure of laterality. Perceptual asymmetries in the visual and auditory modality might also be a relevant factor. How we interact with our environment may also be important, so I am considering measures of spatial abilities.  Some of the preliminary findings on these questions has been published in Voyer & Voyer (2015). Recently, I have wondered whether time perception abilities might relate to accident proneness.  So, if you would like to understand clumsiness and what may affect it, consider getting involved.


 

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